Three For One! Germs, Diseases, and Gross Little Creatures

October 12, 2011

Scroll down for NF Monday.

I’m happy to be hosting Nonfiction Monday. Welcome, everyone. Please post your link in the comment section and I’ll update them throughout the day.

Micro Mania

A Really Close-Up Look at Bacteria, Bedbugs, and the Zillions of Other Gross Little Creatures that Live In, On, and All Around You!

By Jordan D. Brown

Imagine Publishing, 2009; reprint, 2011

ISBN-13: 978-1936140473

Ages 9-12

Nonfiction

Which leads to:

Plagues, Pox, and Pestilence

By Richard Platt

Illustrated by John Kelly

Kingfisher, 2011

ISBN-13: 978-0753466872

Ages 9-12

Nonfiction

And then we go on to my take on the topic:

Infections, Infestations, and Diseases

By Shirley Duke

Rourke, 2011

Ages 9-12

Nonfiction

Rourke

Take a closer look at all three books.

MICRO MANIA

“Try not to panic, but there are billions of tiny creatures crawling all over your skin. They are wriggling on your legs, your arms, your nec, your scalp… EVERYWHERE!”

Micro Mania covers the world of bacteria, pests such as fleas and ticks, food pests like ants, roaches, beetles, and moths, along with kitchen bacteria and where they all live and reproduce. Then the information moves to the bedroom and bathroom, with dust mites, bed bugs, and algae. Plankton, krill, and thermophiles round out the mix of these mini creatures that live with us. The book reveals the amazing characteristics of these organisms and presents the information in a medium gross way that should appeal to this age.

Activity

Look up information about the life cycle of a flea. Then read about the Bubonic Plague. Write a paragraph explaining what part fleas played in the plague’s transmission.

Read about the flea life cycle here.

Here’s some basic bubonic plague information.

PLAGUES, POX, and PESTILENCE

“Do you dare step inside the Pox Lab? In here, we study the history of the world’s most horrible diseases.”

Plagues, Pox, and Pestilence takes the reader deep into the story of diseases in this fascinating book. It includes the story of great epidemics, the people who made history in germs and disease prevention, and how science has provided the technology to fight these invaders today. The final chapter talks about the future of poxes and plagues.

The type adds to the fun of reading this book. It contains a thorough glossary of poxy words and an index. Bright, cartoonish characters add to the action and narration. This is another books kids should love.

Activity

Develop a timeline of scientific discoveries using the information from the book.

Here’s a comprehensive example, but it would need to be narrowed to the examples used in the book.

INFECTIONS, INFESTATIONS, AND DISEASES

“Achoo!”

“Where’s the Kleenex?”

“I don’t feel well.”

How many times has a teacher moved back or a mom has hurried to get the thermometer? Or you’ve checked for nits, worried over vaccines, or stayed up most of the night with a sick child? This book is a starting point for kids interested in what makes you sick or those who are curious about the world and themselves.

The first three chapters address the meaning of the title, covering health and illness, infestations, and then diseases. The next chapter continues with how they are spread, prevention and treatment, and eliminated and emerging diseases. The book addresses current topics like bed bugs, HIV, and the H1N1 flu virus. It has a table of contents, glossary, index, and suggested websites to visit.

Health is important to everyone, and eager young scientists and kids alike should enjoy the fascinating facts in the book. Each book in the series has straightforward science and facts presented in an interesting way to readers. I’m writing three new books for Rourke in the coming year. I can’t wait to blog on them, too!

Activity 1

Research how to wash hands properly. Create a poster to display the correct techniques and practice singing happy birthday two times to show children how long they should spend scrubbing them.

The CDC has a child-friendly set of directions.

The Mayo clinic has additional information about dos and don’ts for hand washing.

Activity 2 (for older kids)

Look at the comparisons of hands that have been washed or cleaned in various ways. Draw a conclusion about the most sanitary means of cleaning hands and write a paragraph about how to properly wash hands to remove bacteria.

You can find good information and pictures here.

Here you’ll find more interesting bacteria and hands information.

National Science Standards: biodiversity and humans; growth and development of organisms

Books provided by the individual publishers.

Nonfiction Monday

Take a look at the great entries for today!

GatheringBooks has Reflections on BOY: Tales of Childhood by Roald Dahl.

Shelf-employed has The Big Thirst: The Secret Life and Turbulent Future of Water.

Ana’s Nonfiction Blog has Don’t Let the Barber Pull Your Teeth. She says t’s a fun read about medieval medicine, with lovely illustrations.

Jennifer at Jean Little Library has Everything Sharks for her “Read Scary” month.

Wild About Nature interviews nonfiction writer Phyllis Perry.

Amanda at A Patchwork of Books has Just a Second by Steve Jenkins.

Roberta at Growing With Science reviews Flesh and Blood So Cheap: The Triangle Fire and its Legacy, a  Cybils nominee and National Book Award finalist.

Jeff at  NC Teacher Stuff has a review of Voices of World War II: Stories from the Front.

Abby the Librarian has a review of Bootleg by Karen Blumenthal.

Tammy at Apples With Many Seeds has Brave Deeds by Ann Alma.

All About the Books with Janet Squires has Helen Keller: Her Life in Pictures  by George Sullivan.

Jone at Check it Out has Swirl by Swirl by Joyce Sidman.

Heidi at Geo Librarian highlights three great books for introducing global studies or just for fun.

Anastasia at Picture Book of the Day has Red Bird Sings: The Story of Zitkala-Sa, Native American Author, Musician, and Activist by Gina Capaldi (Adapter, Illustrator) and Q. L. Pearce (Adapter).

Lynn at Bookends reviews a fun book called A Monster Cookbook by Sarah Schuette that is perfect for Halloween feasts. Take a look–Halloween will be here soon!

 Diane at Practically Paradise  examine ZOMBIES  with a new series from Capstone Press.

Brenda at proseandkahn has Big Wig: a Little History of Hair by Kathleen Krull.


HUMAN BODY A Book With Guts!

July 13, 2011

Human Body

A Book With Guts

By Dan Green

Created by Basher

Kingfisher, 2011

ISBN # Age Range: 10 and up

ISBN: 978-0-7534-6501-1

Grades 5 and up

It’s Nonfiction Monday at Chapter Book of the Day. Stop by!

“Your body is a most amazing machine. It is armed with toollike hands, propelled by two legs, and governed by a brain capable of independent thought (well, sometimes), speech, and problem solving. Supertough on the outside—think skin, hair, nails–your insides comprise all the delicate organs and impressively sophisticated body systems that keep you in perfect shape.”

Human Body follows Basher’s series style with funny and fun-filled facts about all aspects of the human body in this one. Told in the chatty, irreverent manner with subdivisions that include the main groups of body systems, the book will take middle grade kids on a fact-packed ride through the body. Man, woman, and baby are introduced, followed by body building blocks, and funny, descriptive titles for the body systems that follow, such as Wheezing Windbags and Bloody Busybodies (circulatory and respiratory systems), Food Crew and Trash Gang (digestive) Team Players and System Administrators (lymph, immunity, and glands).

A cartoon image faces the text side of the page and helps illustrate the scientific information. The book includes an index and glossary, plus a poster of the overall picture of the book.

The appeal of this book is that it can be read straight through or read out of order, section by section. It is easy to follow and understand and presents information aimed at the middle grade kids who are being introduced to the body and its functions. This is a fun one and reveals the body processes in more like an action film than a science text.

Activity

Choose one body system and list the organs and other parts that make up that system. Look up more quantitative facts for each listed part.

Quantitative facts include facts with numbers.

Trace the movements of what that body system does.

This site has good detailed information about body systems.

This site has more facts about the body systems. It does include the male and female reproductive systems.

National Science Standard: structure and function in living systems

Book provided by publisher


I Know Someone with Diabetes

February 22, 2011

I Know Someone with Diabetes

By Vic Parker

Understanding Health Issues

Heinemann Library, 2011

ISBN #9781-4329-4557-2

Nonfiction

Grades 1-3

“You might have a friend with diabetes mellitus, of just called ‘diabetes.’ Diabetes is a medical condition. This means that a doctor must tell your friend things to do to stay healthy.

This book caught my eye because my father had diabetes in a time when it was more difficult to control. I grew up seeing him take insulin injections daily and observed the results of what the disease can do if it isn’t controlled. It’s in a series that explains health problems to children. The other book in the series that I read is I Know Someone with Cancer.

This book introduces children to the medical condition diabetes, describes how it affects people, and discusses what they can do to be a friend to someone with the medical condition. It explains insulin and how it changes the sugars in food to energy in their bodies, continuing to tell how diabetics don’t have the insulin necessary to do this. The book tells what isn’t known about diabetes, and explains the difference between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes.

In a matter of fact narration, information about controlling diabetes is well explained. Photos clearly show the effects of “going low,” or having too little blood sugar for energy. It continues on to explain why they need something sweet when sugar is ordinarily a thing to avoid. The book ends with tips about what friends can do when a diabetic is your friend. The final spread features famous people with diabetes.

The book has a facts and fiction page, glossary, find out more book list, websites, and an index. Straightforward and simple, it shows diabetics living a normal life among friends. That’s what is important.

Activity 1

Look over the healthy eating information from the National Diabetes Education Program site. Discuss the importance of eating well for everyone. Use their guidelines to create healthy meals for three days, including snacks.

Learn more about healthy eating here.

Take a look at the changes in portion sizes at this site and take the quiz.

Activity 2

Make a food groups chart and draw examples of healthy foods in their groups.

National Science Standard: develop an understanding of personal health

Book provided by publisher.


100th Post! Infections, Infestations, and Diseases

November 10, 2010

Infections, Infestations, and Diseases

By Shirley Duke

Rourke, 2011

Let’s Explore Science Series

ISBN #978-1-61590321-4

Grades 4-6

Nonfiction

It’s my 100th post and I’m still blogging! All thanks to Anastasia Suen, who told me I should.

“I don’t have time to blog.” That’s what I said. After I took her class and got started, with lots of questions and frustrations, I found I liked having a way to keep a tiny bit of teaching and lots of science in my life. I did it on my own terms, and I kept going, delighted by the wealth of new books that relate to science. Now I’m part of the first round CYBILS panel for nonfiction picture books. I can’t wait to blog on many of them.

“Health means being free of disease or pain. Health can refer to the mind, spirit, and body. A body that is healthy can function properly. Muscles, organs, and other systems all work together to help a person live day-to-day life with relative ease. Bodily health is sometimes taken for granted—that is, until someone gets sick. What are the different ways a person can become sick?”

I wrote those words! I still can’t believe it. Even as I’m working on two new science books, I have to stop and remember that I’m writing science books—a goal I’ve desired for a long time.

This book also reminds me why I didn’t continue teaching kindergarten. I interned in kindergarten during my master’s year, but there was simply too much snot! I moved up through the grade levels as the job allowed, spending time in elementary school, middle school, and then high school. Each grade had its own good things, but through the years I taught mostly science, except for the few years an ESL certification beckoned me into a new district or school.

My two favorite grades were second, with its mellow seven year olds, and my year of sheltered biology. It’s amazing how closely science words in Spanish resemble the English words and those students were mostly a delight. I loved writing this book, and actually wrote it before You Can’t Wear These Genes, since genetics wasn’t my best subject (I became knowledgeable again before writing it!) and I’ve always loved health.

“Achoo!”

“Where’s the Kleenex?”

“I don’t feel well.”

How many times has a teacher moved back or a mom has hurried to get the thermometer? Or you’ve checked for nits, worried over vaccines, or stayed up most of the night with a sick child? This book is a starting point for kids interested in what makes you sick or those who are curious about the world and themselves.

The first three chapters address the meaning of the title, covering health and illness, infestations, and then diseases. The next chapter continues with how they are spread, prevention and treatment, and eliminated and emerging diseases. The book addresses current topics like bed bugs, HIV, and the H1N1 flu virus. It has a table of contents, glossary, index, and suggested websites to visit.

Health is important to everyone, and eager young scientists and kids alike should enjoy the fascinating facts in the book. Each book in the series has straightforward science and facts presented in an interesting way to readers. The appeal of each title is evident. The hardest part of talking about these two books? Trying to say them both in one breath!

My scientist blogger friend, Roberta, has a lovely review of my Genes book at her terrific blogs: Wrapped in Foil at and Growing with Science. Be sure to check out her excellent and fun ideas. 

Activity 1

Research how to wash hands properly. Create a poster to display the correct techniques and practice singing happy birthday two times to show children how long they should spend scrubbing them.

The CDC has a child-friendly set of directions.

The Mayo clinic has additional information about dos and don’ts for hand washing.

Activity 2 (for older kids)

Look at the comparisons of hands that have been washed or cleaned in various ways. Draw a conclusion about the most sanitary means of cleaning hands and write a paragraph about how to properly wash hands to remove bacteria.

You can find good information and pictures here.

Here you’ll find more interesting bacteria and hands information.

National Science Standard: organisms and their environments; develop an understanding of personal health

Book supplied by publisher to author (me!).


Human Organs

July 21, 2010

Human Organs

By Kristi Lew

Capstone Press, 2010

Fact Finders Series

ISBN # 978-1-4296-3339-0

Grades 3-5

Nonfiction

    “Lots of people work together to make life in a city possible. Some people work in bakeries and make food. Police and firefighter make sure the city is safe. And other people keep the city clean. Everyone has a job to do.

     Your body is sort of like a city too. Every organ in the human body has an important job to do. Your lungs help you breathe. Your heart pumps blood through your body. And your brain controls everything. In your body, your organs work together to keep you alive.”

As a third grader with a diabetic father, I decided to write a report on the pancreas when assigned to write about the body. I prepared my report and carefully taped an insulin syringe to the cover for decoration (in was in a different time!). I don’t remember what grade I received, but I was hooked. I fell in love with science, especially the body.

I would have loved to have read this book then. While introducing the different organs, it provides the facts but delivers them in a way that kids can relate to, as well as enjoy. The catchy headings like “The Liver Delivers,” “Poop Maker,” and “The Growler” make it entertaining and helps the reader remember the organs.

The cross section image of the heart provokes immediate interest. My husband even picked up the book to look at the cover image. The book begins with a table of contents and relates the body to a city. It goes on to explain systems and what makes an organ, and then traces the jobs of each organ. It ends with a description of the special relationship each organ has with the others. A labeled diagram, glossary, read more and internet section, and an index (which I used to check for pancreas) complete the back matter.

The book doesn’t address the reproductive system, making it elementary library friendly, although it should be there (in my opinion). My only concern, having taught elementary (and middle school) science is the first glimpse of the diagram on page 29. The end of the descending colon appears to be in a forward position, inviting giggles until it becomes clear it’s in the DIGESTIVE system and not the reproductive system.

Activity 1

Make a list of the body systems in this book. Now rank them according to most valuable to least. What sort of ranking did you do? Can one system with its organs be more important that others?

Activity 2

After writing the list of body systems, write the names of the organs that work in each body system by creating a chart or graphic organizer to show at a glance which organ goes with each system.

This site provides good, basic information.

Here is more detailed, extensive information for those interested in the body.

National Science Standard: structure and function in living systems

Book provided by publisher.


OPEN ME UP

October 28, 2009

9780756655327H

Open Me Up     Everything You Need to Know About the Human Body

by Laura Buller, Julie Ferris, Niki Foreman, Fran Jones, Susan Kennedy, Ashwin Khurana, and Richard Walker; Editorial consultant Richard Walker

DK Publishing, 2009

 ISBN #978-0-7566-5532-7

Nonfiction, grades 4 and up

256 pages

This hip, somewhat irreverent book of everything about the body has extensive information presented in a variety of styles and ways that are intended to attract kids to the facts in a nontraditional manner. Examples include a graphic novel style explanation of Fleming’s discovery of penicillin, anatomical illustrations explaining arm muscle mechanics, cartoon style information about hair, and a digestive system illustration made of balloons, all showing one aspect of the way the human body functions. The entire set of systems is presented in one way or another and topics related to the body help round out each section. Back matter includes the body systems with an accompanying illustration and an index.

The cover shows a 3-D die cut of a human body that reveals the inner organs and is sure to attract attention. This book should appeal to students reluctant to learn science in more traditional ways as well as kids who are interested in details, trivia, and other odd facts.

Activity

Select one of the body systems from the book. Create their own graphic style page based on one similar to what is presented in the book to illustrate, explain, and display information about the organs making up that system.

National Science Standard: Structure and function in living systems

 

Book provided by DK Publishing


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