Genes and Infections

December 28, 2011

You Can’t Wear These Genes

Infections, Infestations, and Diseases

Enjoy the holiday season! SimplyScience is revisiting my first two science books while I spend the week with family.  Thank you to my readers. I appreciate all the visits to SimplyScience and the kind comments you leave. I write this blog because I love books and science.

I’ll start the New Year with a terrific book on Olympic technology and I still have one more of my own! Happy New Year!


Nonfiction Book Blast at 2011 ALA

April 4, 2011

I’m featuring my book, YOU CAN’T WEAR THESE GENES, at 2011 ALA in New Orleans this June 26 at 8:00 A.M. on a panel of terrific, prolific, nonfiction authors. Each author on the panel is introducing her 2011 book, along with an activity and handout. We invite everyone at ALA to attend our panel presentation–it’s going to be a blast! Here’s the information.

Welcome to our Nonfiction Book Blast blog right here! We’ll be speaking at ALA 2011 this summer. We invite you to join us!

Nonfiction Book Blast: Booktalks and Activities for Your Library

Start school with new booktalks and activities from ten nonfiction authors: April Pulley Sayre (Rah, Rah, Radishes), Kelly Milner Halls (In Search of Sasquatch), Deborah Heiligman (Charles and Emma), Loree Griffin Burns (The Hive Detectives), Carla Killough McClafferty (The Many Faces of George Washington), Christine Taylor-Butler (Magnets), Shirley Duke (You Can’t Wear These Genes), Darcy Pattison (Prairie Storms), Carla Mooney (Explorers of the New World) and Anastasia Suen (Read and Write Sports). (Handouts)

Visit Nonfiction Monday at L.L. Owens for a comprehensive list of good books.

You Can’t Wear These Genes

You Can’t Wear These Genes

by Shirley Duke

Rourke, 2011

Let’s Explore Science Series

ISBN #978-1-61590-563-8

Grades 4-7

Nonfiction

      “You have your mother’s green eyes.”

     “Your chin comes from your father.”

     “You must get your musical ability from your parents.”

     People have always noticed traits, or characteristics, that are similar between parents and their kids. Some of these traits, such as eye color and a dimpled chin, can be easily seen. Other traits, like blood type and personality, cannot be seen.

     Parents pass down traits to their offspring, or young. The offspring have these inherited traits for the rest of their lives. Genetics is the branch of science that studies how traits are passed along.

My first science book as the author! It’s been a dream of mine to write a science book and now I have. This one, and the other one I wrote, are in the Let’s Explore Science series by Rourke. This is the book I’m featuring on the Nonfiction Book Blast panel at 2011 ALA in New Orleans.

This introduction to genetics covers the basics of what it takes to pass along hereditary material and how it is manifested in offspring of humans, touching on animals and plants. Complicated terms and processes are explained on a reading level accessible by elementary readers. Labeled graphics and large photos help clarify the text and make the book appealing and bright.

Beginning with the basic building block, the cell, after defining genes and DNA, the chapters continue with boy or girl, combining traits, problems with genes, and the future of genetics. Short sidebars scattered throughout the text give additional information and break up the text into readable chunks. The book contains a strong glossary, index, and website information, plus a picture and bio of the author—that’s me!

This complicated subject is made easier to understand in You Can’t Wear These Genes and explores the very beginnings of genetics while making it accessible to young readers (something I had a great deal of experience doing as a teacher). The wealth of knowledge being discovered in this complex field is arriving weekly and this book is an excellent way for young scientists to begin to understand how the cycle of life and growth occur.

Activity

Create your own DNA sequence. Use this activity to put together base pairs. As each pair is joined, write down the sequence for 20 pairs and then read the information below the model. Then look up what components create the “rungs” of the DNA ladder. Draw a simple diagram and label the parts.

Here’s a good place to start for more information.

Here’s more excellent information about genetics.

National Science Standard: reproduction and heredity

Book is author’s own copy


You Can’t Wear These Genes

October 13, 2010

You Can’t Wear These Genes

by Shirley Duke

Rourke, 2011

Let’s Explore Science Series

ISBN #978-1-61590-563-8

Grades 4-7

Nonfiction

      “You have your mother’s green eyes.”

     “Your chin comes from your father.”

     “You must get your musical ability from your parents.”

     People have always noticed traits, or characteristics, that are similar between parents and their kids. Some of these traits, such as eye color and a dimpled chin, can be easily seen. Other traits, like blood type and personality, cannot be seen.

     Parents pass down traits to their offspring, or young. The offspring have these inherited traits for the rest of their lives. Genetics is the branch of science that studies how traits are passed along.

My first science book as the author! It’s been a dream of mine to write a science book and now I have. This one, and the other one I wrote, are in the Let’s Explore Science series by Rourke. This is the book I’m featuring on the Nonfiction Book Blast panel at 2011 ALA in New Orleans.

This introduction to genetics covers the basics of what it takes to pass along hereditary material and how it is manifested in offspring of humans, touching on animals and plants. Complicated terms and processes are explained on a reading level accessible by elementary readers. Labeled graphics and large photos help clarify the text and make the book appealing and bright.

Beginning with the basic building block, the cell, after defining genes and DNA, the chapters continue with boy or girl, combining traits, problems with genes, and the future of genetics. Short sidebars scattered throughout the text give additional information and break up the text into readable chunks. The book contains a strong glossary, index, and website information, plus a picture and bio of the author—that’s me!

This complicated subject is made easier to understand in You Can’t Wear These Genes and explores the very beginnings of genetics while making it accessible to young readers (something I had a great deal of experience doing as a teacher). The wealth of knowledge being discovered in this complex field is arriving weekly and this book is an excellent way for young scientists to begin to understand how the cycle of life and growth occur.

Activity

Create your own DNA sequence. Use this activity to put together base pairs. As each pair is joined, write down the sequence for 20 pairs and then read the information below the model. Then look up what components create the “rungs” of the DNA ladder. Draw a simple diagram and label the parts.

Here’s a good place to start for more information.

Here’s more excellent information about genetics.

Nonfiction Monday is at Mother Reader. Take a look at many more great nonfiction books there.

National Science Standard: reproduction and heredity

Book is author’s own copy


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