I’m a Scientist Kitchen

November 17, 2010

I’m A Scientist Kitchen

By Lisa Burke

DK Publishing, 2010

Nonfiction

Pre-K—2nd grade

“Dear Science Detective,

Let’s find out about the world you live in. You can be a great science detective if you look for clues, ask questions, and try to answer them. Carry a notebook to make draings and to write down your thoughts. Have a box for collecting things. This s your world of wonder—the beginning of a lifelong learning journey. Remember: Nothing is too hard for a science detective like you! Lift the Flap on every spread for the Science Stuff. It’s the facts behind the fun!”

This book combines science with everyday items generally found in the kitchen and guides the early scientists through basic science principles in fun, easy-to-do experiments. It encourages kids to record data, think about their activity, and ask questions while marveling at the fun they have conducting the experiments.

After the experiments, you can lift the flap and see the science principle behind each activity. The materials are inexpensive and common around most households, making the book parent or teacher friendly while exciting young children about what happens in each experiment and encouraging them to ask why as they learn the reasons behind each activity.

Big, bright photos highlight each experiment that extends across each spread and easily followed directions come with large numbers to guide the process. Pictures illustrate each of the materials and a large photo shows the results. The book sets up the scientific method process in a way that young children can understand and follow without actually using the terms, setting the pattern for future investigations. To see the science behind it all, lift the flap on each spread.

The book includes density, static electricity, engineering, oxidation, magnetism, colloids, insulation and states of matter, proteins, and refraction, all made easy to understand. It has a nice glossary and a shopping list as back matter and the publisher information fills the final cover flap.

I’d say every early childhood classroom and family with preschoolers needs this book. An early introduction to science is a fun way to learn and with the push for the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) subjects, it’s a great book to get kids interested in the processes of science and learning.

Activity

Try an experiment from the book. Create a journal of the steps by illustrating each one as the experiment is performed. Use the scientific process to record findings in the journal and what the kids learned.

Here are some more fun experiments.

Use this page to help you show the scientific method.

Check out Nonfiction Monday at SLJ’s Practically Paradise.

National Science Standard: abilities necessary to do scientific inquiry; understanding about scientific inquiry

Book provided by publisher.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 112 other followers